Opera News:

Eugene Galvin combined a rich voice with splendid musicianship as Callistene. (Poliuto - Donizetti)

 
Emile DeBecque - South Pacific

Emile DeBecque - South Pacific

Galvin's powerful voice was at its warmest in "Some Enchanted Evening" from Rodgers & and Hammerstein's "South Pacific." (WASHINGTON POST)

 
 
Colline - La Boheme

Colline - La Boheme

No opera in the world is shorter, simpler or funnier than Domenico Cimarosa’s “Il Maestro di Cappella,” which got a scintillating performance Sunday. It needs only one singer: on this occasion, bass Gene Galvin. Done properly, it is hilarious, and it was done properly in this performance. Galvin’s voice is rich in tone, flexible in expression; he is as talented in acting as in singing. (Washington Post)

Pandolfe - Cendrillon

Pandolfe - Cendrillon

 

Eugene Galvin, who didn't have a lot to sing as Alidoro (this version's fairy godmother), was always felt as a silent presence. Whether at the edge of the stage or when comforting and encouraging Angelica, he carried off the role with dignity and a wry sense of omniscience. (Washington Post)

Gene Galvin as Schicchi turned in a more-than-respectable performance, quietly giving the character more weight than the others onstage without rubbing everyone’s face in it, and offering solid singing to boot. (Washington Post - Gianni Schicchi with In Series, DC)

Heading up the list in this production is bass-baritone Eugene Galvin, whose arch, cynical, yet witty take on the title character gives this version of the opera an extra dose of spice. Secure and confident in the role, Mr. Galvin also proves an effective vocalist, whose voice articulates control and authority the moment he steps onstage.